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Jill Lepore: These Truths, Chapter Six

Album Description

See the related Chapter 6 discussion: "Lepore focuses on some of the changes happening in the country such as the Second Great Awakening, industrialization, improved communication technology just to name a few. How did these changes intersect and how did they shape the nation moving into the mid-1800s?" 

  bestof 

PBS, William Lloyd Garrison

National Women's History Museum, William Lloyd Garrison

Smithsonian Digital Volunteers: Transcription Center, The Liberator

Accessible Archives, The Liberator

The Liberator Files

[William Lloyd Garrison, abolitionist, journalist, and editor of The Liberator]

Reference note

Created / Published: [ca. 1870]
Subject Headings: -  Garrison, William Lloyd,--1805-1879
-  Abolitionists--1860-1880
-  Journalists--1860-1880
Genre: Portrait photographs--1860-1880
Albumen prints--1860-1880
Cartes de visite--1860-1870
Notes: -  Title devised by Library staff.
-  Notation on verso: "William Lloyd Garrison"
-  Gift; Tom Liljenquist; 2016; (DLC/PP-2017:171, formerly deposit D072)
-  Purchased from: Medhurst & Co., North Liberty, Iowa, June 2016.
-  Forms part of: Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs (Library of Congress).
-  pp/liljpaper
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
Digital Id: ppmsca 53260 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.53260
ppmsca 53261 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.53261

Ohio Central History, The Second Great Awakening

Religious Transformation and the Second Great Awakening

LOC Exhibition, Religion and the Founding of the American Republic

LOC US History Primary Source Timeline, The Rise of Industrial America

LOC US History Primary Source Timeline, National Expansion and Reform

Economic Growth and the Industrial Revolution

History Teaching Institute, Lesson Plan, The Industrial Revolution

Erie Canal, Rochester, N.Y.

Reference note

Contributor Names: Detroit Publishing Co., copyright claimant
Detroit Publishing Co., publisher
Created / Published: [between 1900 and 1906]
Subject Headings: -  Canals
-  Barges
-  United States--New York (State)--Rochester
-  United States--New York (State)--Erie Canal
Genre: Dry plate negatives
Notes: -  "G 2355" on negative.
-  Detroit Publishing Co. no. 017931.
-  Gift; State Historical Society of Colorado; 1949.
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
Digital Id: det 4a12121 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/det.4a12121

Erie Canal at Little Falls

Reference note

Contributor Names: Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942, photographer
Detroit Publishing Co., publisher
Created / Published: [between 1880 and 1897]
Subject Headings: -  Barges
-  Canals
-  United States--New York (State)--Little Falls
-  United States--New York (State)--Erie Canal
Genre: Dry plate negatives
Notes: -  Attribution to Jackson based on similarity of title to photo no. 4018 in Catalogue of the W.H. Jackson Views (1898).
-  "07881" on negative.
-  Detroit Publishing Co. no. 7626.
-  Gift; State Historical Society of Colorado; 1949.
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
Digital Id: det 4a26913 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/det.4a26913

Erie. Canalway, National Heritage Corridor

The Erie Canal

National Park Service, The Erie Canalway

Ohio History Central, The Temperance Movement

Prohibition, An Interactive History, Women Led the Temperance Charge

Social Welfare History Project, Temperance Movement

PBS, Prohibition: Roots of Prohibition

LOC Research Guides, Temperance Movement & Prohibition

LOC Article, Songs of the Temperance Movement and Prohibition

Tree of intemperance / [Archibald] Macbrairs, lith.

Reference note

Summary: The second of a pair of prints (see "Tree of Temperance," no. 1855-2) issued by A. D. Fillmore in 1855 expounding on the benefits of temperance and the evils of drink. In the center grows a gnarled tree whose roots are schnappes, whiskey, wine, beer, and other spirits. Around its trunk winds a giant serpent with an apple in its mouth and a mug of beer on its head. The trunk branches out into limbs marked "Diseases Corporeal," "Ignorance," "Vice," "Crime," and "Immorality." These in turn divide into smaller branches representing a plethora of social and moral evils, such as wars, drunkenness, anarchy, counterfeiting, dueling, and "Breach of the Peace." Below, on the left is a procession of prohibition men, holding banners reading "Hurrah! for the Maine Law" and "All together." (The Maine Liquor Law of 1851 was a landmark in the history of prohibition and was widely adopted in other states.) One man chops at the roots of the tree with an ax. On the right are barren thorn bushes (in contrast to the healthy, foliated brush on the left) and several men in various states of inebriation and despondency.
Contributor Names: Macbrair, Archibald, lithographer
Created / Published: [Cincinnati : published by A.D. Fillmore], c1855.
Subject Headings: -  Temperance movement
-  Maine, temperance laws in
Genre: Lithographs--1850-1860
Notes: -  Title from item.
-  Though unsigned, the print was probably printed by Archibald MacBrair like its companion piece "Tree of Intemperance," which bears this lithographer's imprint.
-  "Entered ... 1855 by A.D. Fillmore ... Ohio."
-  The Library's impression was deposited for copyright on January 25, 1855.
-  Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1855-3.
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
Digital Id: pga 11564 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pga.11564
cph 3a16876 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a16876

N. Currier, “Tree of Temperance” and “Tree of Intemperance,” 1849. Courtesy American Antiquarian Society.

Nathaniel Currier, “The Drunkard’s Progress.” 1846. Wikimedia.

PBS, Denmark Vesey

National Park Service, Denmark Vesey

BlackPast, Denmark Vesey Conspiracy of 1822

Teaching with Primary Sources - MTSU Newsletter, Immigration Volume II September 2017

Teaching with Primary Sources - MTSU Newsletter, Immigration, September 2010

Teaching with Primary Sources - MTSU Lesson Plan, Immigration in 19th Century America

Teaching with Primary Sources - MTSU Primary Source Set, Migration

LOC, Irish-Catholic Immigration to America

Reimagining Migration, Historical Context: Irish Immigrants in the 19th Century

PBS, Destination America: When did they come?

PBS, Trail of Tears

National Park Service, Trail of Tears

Museum of the Cherokee Indian, The Trail of Tears

Teaching with Primary Sources - MTSU Primary Source Set, Trail of Tears

Teaching with Primary Sources - MTSU Lesson Plan, Trail of Tears

LOC Research Guides, Indian Removal Act: Primary Documents in American History

American Battlefield Trust, Nullification Crisis

LOC Research Guides, Nullification Proclamation: Primary Documents in American History

The Hermitage, Andrew Jackson and Nullification

PBS, The West, Sam Houston

Sam Houston Memorial Museum

America's Library - Sam Houston and the Battle for Texas Independence

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836

Texas State Historical Association, Texas Revolution

National Endowment for the Humanities, King Andrew and the Bank

The Hermitage, Andrew Jackson and the Bank War

Article, The Log House as Cultural Symbol

How the Log Cabin Become an American Symbol

General Jackson slaying the many headed monster

Reference note

Summary: A satire on Andrew Jackson's campaign to destroy the Bank of the United States and its support among state banks. Jackson, Martin Van Buren, and Jack Downing struggle against a snake with heads representing the states. Jackson (on the left) raises a cane marked "Veto" and says, "Biddle thou Monster Avaunt!! avaount I say! or by the Great Eternal I'll cleave thee to the earth, aye thee and thy four and twenty satellites. Matty if thou art true...come on. if thou art false, may the venomous monster turn his dire fang upon thee..." Van Buren: "Well done General, Major Jack Downing, Adams, Clay, well done all. I dislike dissentions beyond every thing, for it often compels a man to play a double part, were it only for his own safety. Policy, policy is my motto, but intrigues I cannot countenance." Downing (dropping his axe): "Now now you nasty varmint, be you imperishable? I swan Gineral that are beats all I reckon, that's the horrible wiper wot wommits wenemous heads I guess..." The largest of the heads is president of the Bank Nicholas Biddle's, which wears a top hat labeled "Penn" (i.e. Pennsylvania) and "$35,000,000." This refers to the rechartering of the Bank by the Pennsylvania legislature in defiance of the adminstration's efforts to destroy it.
Contributor Names: Robinson, Henry R., -1850.
Created / Published: N.Y. : Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 1836.
Subject Headings: -  Adams, John Quincy,--1767-1848
-  Biddle, Nicholas,--1786-1844
-  Clay, Henry,--1777-1852.--Political activity
-  Jackson, Andrew,--1767-1845
-  Van Buren, Martin,--1782-1862
-  Bank of Pennsylvania--1830-1840
-  Bank of the United States--1830-1840
-  Pennsylvania--1830-1840
-  Downing, Jack or "Zek" (Fictitious character)
Notes: -  Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St. N.Y.
-  Title appears as it is written on the item.
-  Weitenkampf cites another version of the print issued by Robinson with the date 1836, and suggests that the present version is a reversed copy of that. One print with this title was registered for copyright by Robinson on March 29, 1836.
-  Weitenkampf, p. 39-40.
-  Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)
-  Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1836-7.
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
Digital Id: cph 3a05364 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a05364

Old Jack, the famous New Orleans mouser, clearing Uncle Sam's barn of bank and Clay rats; ...

Reference note

Summary: A rare pro-Jackson satire on the President's campaign to destroy the political power and influence of the Bank of the United States. It was probably issued late in the presidential campaign of 1832, after Jackson's July veto of the bill to re-charter the Bank. (Weitenkampf tentatively dated the print 1833, but the Library's impression was deposited for copyright on September 12, 1832.) Jackson is portrayed as a cat (with a tail marked "Veto") defending the corn cribs in "Uncle Sam's Barn" from rats "which had burrow'd through the floor, to get at his capital Corn Crib: While Uncle Sam, and his active laborers, stand at the door, enjoying the sport." The cat has one rat in his mouth, possibly Henry Clay, who says, "My case is desperate." Under his paws is another (possibly the Bank's president Nicholas Biddle) who says, "Them d'd Clay-Bank Rats brought me to this." In the lower left a rat with a cape and his paw on a Bible says, "My Cloak does not cover me, as well as I could wish, but this Book with it, will be a good passport to the Corn Crib." Other rats creeping from holes in the floor say, "I'l keep in my hole while he's in sight" and "No chance for me whie he's in the Barn." At the upper right two rats (possibly influential pro-Bank newspaper editors James Watson Webb and Charles King) nibble corn, remarking, "The U.S. Bank Rats are very liberal to us Editor Rats, we must stick to them at all risks." From an open doorway three men, "Uncle Sam and his active laborers," survey the scene. First man: "Bravo my Boys! keep him in the Barn; and no doubt, but he will keep the Rats away." Second: "What a tail he carries! I guess he is of the Kilkenny breed." Third: "How he nicks them." The use of rats to symbolize corruption was commonplace in cartoons of the 1830s, particularly with respect to the Bank of the United States. See ""This is the house that Jack built"" (no. 1833-6). For their use in another context see ".00001. The value of a unit..." and "The Rats Leaving a Falling House" (nos. 1831-1 and 1831-2).
Contributor Names: Williams, Michael.
Created / Published: 1832.
Subject Headings: -  Biddle, Nicholas,--1786-1844
-  Clay, Henry,--1777-1852.--Political activity
-  Jackson, Andrew,--1767-1845
-  King, Charles,--1789-1867
-  Webb, J. Watson.--(James Watson),--1802-1884
-  Bank of the United States--1830-1840
-  Economic policy--1830-1840
Notes: -  Copyright secur'd 1832.
-  Michael Williams Del et Lith 44 Canal Street N.Y.
-  Title appears as it is written on the item.
-  Weitenkampf, p. 29.
-  Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)
-  Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1832-5.
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
Digital Id: cph 3b03074 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b03074

Henry David Thoreau

The Writings of Henry David Thoreau

LOC Today in History, Henry David Thoreau

Teaching with Primary Sources - MTSU Close Reading Exercise, “Civil Disobedience” by Henry David Thoreau